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Decipher the mystery named pink dolphin

To protect the pink dolphin, the world’s largest river dolphin, scientists are trying to solve the mystery of their life and habitat from the effects of climate change and humans. 

Fishermen who once caught rare pink river dolphins (also known as Boto’s dolphins, Amazonian dolphins) are working with researchers from the Bolivian Amazon jungle in a high-tech effort to keep them safe and secure. existence of these animals and better understand their needs.

Scientists from global environmental group WWF and Bolivian NGO Faunagua recently tagged four freshwater dolphins in the Ichilo River using satellite technology that allows fishermen to use a mobile phone app to report their site.

Paul Van Damme, from Faunagua, said: “They (the fishermen) hunted dolphins for different purposes. Now, we are making them aware and making them our companions in our research on this red river dolphin. “

According to WWF, despite the iconic status of the river dolphin, little is known about its populations and habitats. Fishermen who still regularly cross the river will provide scientists with information on what dolphins eat, how far they migrate, and clues about the threats they face.

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Lila Sainz, head of WWF Bolivia, they give fishermen a new look at the animals that have been their prey for many years.

Sainz said, “Everything that affects dolphins affects humans who also use these resources. So if dolphins live well, that also proves that the living environment for humans is good. “

The vast Bolivian Amazon rainforest is an important habitat for many species, from dolphins to birds and jaguars, whose existence is threatened by deforestation, dams, wildfires and evolution.

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